Using Your Intuitive Abilities

Panther Totem
Paw
People often wonder why I'm a massage therapist.  These people also wonder how I can get along without the power of our totems involved in this type of work.  For a long time, when I first began working in a licensed practice, I was very cloistered and cut off from my spiritual source of power.  I had intentionally let go of the concepts that had fueled my practice of shamanism out of concern that their acknowledgment and use could interfere with my licensed work.  I was there to practice massage therapy, after all, and not shamanism.  From the very basics, shamanism has very little to do with the art of therapeutic massage, although quite a lot to do with the basic connection of human touch.

In our touch-deprived world, we have found confusion on the distinctions between gender and sex, touch and romance, and what they possibly mean for a straight guy in a professional bodywork practice.  For a lot of people, there is a genuine gender preference when it comes to receiving a therapeutic massage.  This sometimes makes sense as our social conditioning wants us to believe that women are the only nurturers or providers of a compassionate human touch.  For others, they may prefer a male therapist, as the perception of physical strength comes into play when considering how best to receive a deep tissue massage, for example.  Neither one of these services provides sex, although gender is a deciding factor for each.

As a person that sat quietly in meditation this morning, I found my thoughts wandering and wondering how I would address these topics in a blog post.  I was surprised at the patterns and the thought process that continually returned to gender, and how I had cut myself off from my spiritual sources early in my bodywork practice.  This thought process was also about finding the value of those first few years of massage practice, and how they've informed a refined, and intentional touch.  It seems to me, and this comes from own, and from hearing the horror stories of women and men practicing in a therapeutic setting, that there are many people out there — regardless of gender — that are practicing for sex.  This should come as no surprise as the very basic needs of money, sex and love often overlap our intentions, however subtle they may be, when bridging this healing work into our lives.

We see this time and time again with male and female therapists offering sex for money, and there's no place for it in this type of therapeutic setting.

From a shamanic perspective, these energies can be quite intense.  Often Kundalini in nature, these serpent energies are so basic, so inbred into the human condition, that some people may lose sight of their personal and professional boundaries when giving or receiving a deeply nurturing healing session.  To feel loved in a professional capacity can throw a person into the blurry lines of a therapeutic setting, and cause confusion on what the person may have been seeking.  I have seen this on repeated occasions with both male and female clients in a previous business setting; these lack of boundaries and basic communication skills are easily spread in the work environment and can affect the progress of coworkers, including the flow of business itself.  It's toxic to bring sex into your massage or bodywork practice, and while this may fall into the category of Business Etiquette #101, its importance cannot be underscored.