Koyaanisqatsi – Philip Glass


I'm going to take a step back and mention that many years ago I was connected to a fair amount of indigenous communities on social media.  Since then, and since I've deleted a majority of my social media accounts, I've found that I've never wanted to speak out of turn regarding an indigenous person's outlook on the white man's world.  As a white person, and as a person that was not born on a reservation, or into an indigenous community, I've learned to pause and to listen to what they're saying.

There's still a lot of anger at the white person, and their form of government, and it becomes even more obvious when we see the greed, lust, and fear that motivates Washington D.C.'s decision-makers to continue to take those things that most indigenous people hold as sacred – their land.  And with the acquisition of their land, we also see their sovereignty and those treaties that remain at the backbone of their relationship to the US Government, taken from them.  We also hear stories, more horror stories, of the 18th and 19th-century hostilities towards their tribal rights, and the violence that surrounded them.

I made a comment regarding a relationship to the stars, or the Earth, and how it connects to an outsider's view of the Christian church.  One of the immediate messages that I received was that many American Indians, and Central American Indians, attend church and furthermore incorporate the teachings of Christ into their form of Earth-based spirituality.  In this case, we could take a look at the term Brotherhood, despite all of the negativity this term implies, and find a simple, universal truth that connects us all.  Specifically, when we look further into the Hopi stories of Pahana or the Lost White Brother, we will see that a unifying message of Universal Brotherhood is emerging from a series of prophecies that continue to connect the human race, to its ancestors, in this galaxy, and amongst the stars.